Feature Reports

The Long Road to Carbon Pricing

Carbon emissions from human activities contribute to global warming. © THINKSTOCK

Assigning a cost to CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions by "putting a price on carbon" is recognized as one of the most effective means of combating climate change. Several mechanisms can be used to do this, including carbon trading markets and taxation (See Close-Up: "Mechanisms for "Putting a Price on Carbon"). The Kyoto Protocol, signed in December 1997, was the first international mechanism designed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by putting a price on carbon. Over the past few years, a variety of initiatives launched by regions, major cities, large companies and associations have built on this original intergovernmental approach (See Close-Up: "From the Kyoto Protocol to National and Regional Commitments"). In 2005, the European Union put in place a carbon trading market that was the first – and is still the largest – of its kind in the world. But the price of carbon has so far failed to reach sufficient levels to send a meaningful signal to greenhouse gas emitters (See Close-Up: The European Emissions Trading Market).

fr-Carbone : débat autour du « prix de la tonne »

Assigning a cost to CO2See Carbon Dioxid and other greenhouse gas (ghg) Gas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... emissions by "putting a price on carbon" is recognized as one of the most effective means of combating climate change. Several mechanisms can be used to do this, including carbon tradingThe buying and selling of products in financial markets... markets and taxation.

Read more
Le marché international du protocole de Kyoto

The Kyoto ProtocolInternational agreement linked to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change..., signed in December 1997, was the first international mechanism designed to reduce greenhouse gas (ghg) Gas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... emissions by putting a price on carbon. Over the past few years, a variety of initiatives launched by regions, major cities, large companies and associations have built on this original intergovernmental approach.

Read more
fr-Carbone : le marché européen d’échange de quotas

In 2005, the European Union put in place a carbon tradingThe buying and selling of products in financial markets... market that was the first – and is still the largest – of its kind in the world. But the price of carbon has so far failed to reach sufficient levels to send a meaningful signal to greenhouse gas (ghg) Gas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... emitters.

Read more
fr - Changement climatique : la mobilisation de la communauté internationale

Climate change caused by greenhouse gas (ghg) Gas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... emissions is, by its very nature, a global issue. A common strategy and binding targets must therefore be defined on a planetary scale. This is the aim of the international climate change conferences held in Rio, Copenhagen and, in December 2015, Paris. The solutions then need to be implemented locally. 

Read more
fr - push - GIEC

Valérie Masson-Delmotte, Senior Scientist at the Climate and Environmental Sciences Laboratory in Gif-sur-Yvette, France, was the coordinating lead author of a chapter in the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)Body established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988....

Read more
The European Carbon Emissions Trading Scheme

In 2005, the European Union introduced the first carbon market, which remains the largest emissions tradingThe buying and selling of products in financial markets... scheme in the world, covering almost 50% of Europe’s CO2See Carbon Dioxid emissions. Although it may at first seem complex, the way it works is explained here using just a few images, in a video put together by IFP Énergies Nouvelles, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME) and CDC-Climat-Recherche.

 

Read more