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Understanding the plan to release treated Fukushima water

Japan's decision to release more than one million tonnes of treated radioactive water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea has stirred fierce controversy.

Here are some questions and answers about the plan, expected to take decades to complete.

What is the processed water?

Since the 2011 nuclear disaster, radioactive water has accumulated at the plant, including liquid used for cooling, and rain and groundwater that has seeped in.

Japan to release treated Fukushima water into the sea

Japan will release more than a million tonnes of treated water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the ocean, the government said Tuesday, despite concern from neighbouring countries and fierce opposition from local fishing communities.

The process is not likely to begin for several years and could take decades to complete, but it has already stirred significant controversy at home and abroad.

Japan to release treated Fukushima water into the sea: PM

Japan's government on Tuesday approved a plan to release more than one million tonnes of treated water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the ocean, in a controversial decision that follows years of debate.

The release, which is not likely to begin for several years and could take decades to complete, has sparked concern in neighbouring countries and faces fierce opposition from local fishing communities and anti-nuclear activists.

Green groups denounce Sino-French African pipeline deal

French green groups on Monday denounced a newly inked multi-national accord to build a massive crude oil pipeline in East Africa, warning of huge environmental risks.

The Ugandan and Tanzanian governments joined oil companies Total of France and China's CNOOC on Sunday in signing accords paving the way for the construction of what has been described as potentially the world's longest heated pipeline, some 1,400 kilometres (900 miles) long.