Tell me more

Infographics

Gas Pipelines: a Central Part of E.U.-Russia Relations

Existing or planned natural gas pipelines from Russia/CIS to Europe

BACK TO PIPELINES FROM RUSSIA/CIS
 
TAP (TRANS ADRIATIC PIPELINE)

PIPELINE

Scheduled to come on stream in 2020
(construction gets underway in
mid-2016)
Capacity : bcm/yr at first,
then doubled

Length : 880 km
Gas source : Azerbaijan (Shah Deniz
gas field)

Route (from Turkey) : Greece – Albania – Adriatic Sea – Italy
 
  FILTERS
Existing or planned natural gas pipelines from Russia/CIS to Europe
Select a type of gas pipeline,
then select a route
Sources : Gazprom export ; Gazprom ; Tanap ; Trans Adriatic
Pipeline ; BP ; Natural Gas Europe ; Nord Stream ; South
Stream Transport
5éme Gauche for planete-energies.com
 
Existing or planned natural gas pipelines from Russia/CIS to Europe
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline NORD STREAM
Came on stream in November 2011 (first line), October 2012 (second line)
Capacity : 55  bcm/yr (2 lines x 27.5 bcm/yr)
Length : 1,224 km
Gas source : Western Siberia, via the Gryazovets-Vyborg feeder pipeline (917 km) connected to Yamal
Route (from Russia): under the Baltic from Vyborg (917  km), connected to Yamal.
Partners : Gazprom, EON, Wintershall, OMV, Shell, Engie
Proposed third line (55  bcm/yr) announced in June 2015.
Note that since late 2015, construction of this new line has been opposed by the Central European countries and Italy (upset at the blockage of the South Stream project due to delays by the European Union).
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline YAMAL EUROPE
Came on stream in 2006
Capacity : 33bcm/yr
Length : 2,800 km in Russia, around 4,000 km in all
Gas source : Yamal Peninsula in the Kara Sea
Route (from Russia) : Belarus – Poland – Germany
Partners : Gazprom, Beltrangaz, PGNiG
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline BROTHERHOOD
Came on stream in 1967
Capacity : 100 bcm/yr
Length : around 4,000 km long
Gas source : the north of Western Siberia and the Volga Basin (Soyuz branch)
Route (from Russia) : Ukraine – Slovakia, then splits into two branches:
Czech Republic – Germany/Benelux/France and Austria – Italy/Slovenia/Croatia
Partners : Gazprom, UkrTransGas
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline BLUE STREAM
Came on stream in February 2003
Capacity : 16 bcm/yr
Length : 1,213 km
Gas source : Russia
Route (from Russia) : under the Black Sea, from Beregovya to Samsun (Turkey)
Partners : Gazprom, ENI
In December 2014, a new line was proposed, with capacity to transport 63  bcm/yr (the same as the South Stream project canceled at the same time by Russia).
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline NABUCCO
Project backed by the European Union Initially scheduled to come on stream in 2017.
Capacity : 31 bcm/yr (of which 10 from Azerbaijan)
Length : 3,300 km
Gas source : Azerbaijan (Shah Deniz gas field) and possibly Iran
Route (from Azerbaijan) : Georgia – Turkey – Bulgaria – Romania – Hungary – Austria – Czech Republic – Germany
The project has been suspended due to a preference for the TANAP and, especially, the TAP lines. Other unfavorable factors include falling gas prices, competition from coal and the projected development of renewable energies. In March 2015, Bulgaria tried to relaunch the project's western branch, known as Nabucco West.
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline TAP (TRANSADRIATIC PIPELINE)
Scheduled to come on stream in 2020 (construction gets underway in mid-2016).
Capacity : 10 bcm/yr at first, then doubled
Length : 880 km
Gas source : Azerbaijan (Shah Deniz gas field)
Route (from Turkey) : Greece – Albania – Adriatic Sea – Italy
On June 28, 2013, the Shah Deniz II consortium (BP, Total, ENI-Lukoil joint venture Lukagip, Nico, Socar and TPAO) chose the TAP project to transport natural gas to Italy. It will be supplied by the planned TANAP (and possibly by the TurkStream).
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline TANAP/SCP
Scheduled to come on stream in 2018 (construction got underway in 2015).
Capacity : 10 bcm/yr at first, then doubled
Length : 1,841 km
Gas source : Azerbaijan (Shah Deniz gas field)
Route : Georgian border – Erzurum – Eskisehir – Biga (Turkey)
Partners : Socar, Botas, BP
This project is part of the Southern gas corridor supplying Europe with gas from Azerbaijan.
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline TURKSTREAM
In July 2016, Russia and Turkey re-started the TurkStream project (formerly known as Turkish Stream), which had been stalled for several months due to diplomatic tensions between the two countries. However, the decision to build the pipeline has not yet been made.
Capacity : initially 63 bcm/yr, unilaterally reduced by Gazprom to 32 bcm /yr
Length : around 920 km under the Black Sea
Gas source : Russia
Route : Anapa (Russia) – Kirikoy (northwestern Turkey) – Ipsala (Turkey on the Greek border)
Partners : Gazprom, Botas
  Back to pipelines from Russia/CIS
Pipeline SOUTH STREAM
A Nabucco rival supported by Russia. Announced in 2007, construction began in 2012.
Initially scheduled to come on stream in 2016, with ramp-up to full capacity in 2018.
Capacity : 63 bcm/yr
Length : 3,600 km
Gas source : Russia, Caspian Sea countries (linked to the proposed Trans-Caspian Gas Pipeline)
Route (from Russia) : Djougba – Black Sea – Burgas (Bulgaria), with a possible split into two branches: Serbia – Hungary – Austria – Slovenia – Italy or Greece – Italy
Partners for the subsea section : Gazprom, ENI, EDF, Wintershall
On December 1, 2014, Russia officially canceled the project due to delays and, probably, EU sanctions in the wake of the annexation of Crimea.
Sources : Gazprom export ; Gazprom ; Tanap ; Trans Adriatic
Pipeline ; BP ; Natural Gaz Europe ; Nord Stream ; South
Stream Transport
5éme Gauche for planete-energies.com
 

Around one-third of all natural gas consumed in the European Union (E.U.) comes from Russia. During the Soviet Union era, 80% of Russian natural gas transited through the Brotherhood gas pipelinePipeline used to transport gas over a long distance, either on land or on the seabed., which passes through Ukraine. After the collapse of the U.S.S.R., frequent tensions between Ukraine and Russia led to a search for alternative routes, both to the north and the south. In the north, the Yamal-Europe pipeline became widely used and Germany built the Nord Stream (also known as North Stream) pipeline under the Baltic Sea, thereby bypassing Belarus, Ukraine and Poland. In the south, the situation is highly complex. In 2003, Moscow and Ankara inaugurated the Blue Stream pipeline under the Black Sea to supply Turkey with natural gas. Russia was planning on expanding capacity under the Black Sea with the South Stream pipeline, but abandoned the project at the end of 2014. Russia then announced its TurkStream project, which would not transport natural gas to Europe beyond the Greek-Turkish border. However, regional crises shaped by events in Syria, Iraq and Russian-Turkish tensions halted construction. Europe had for some time entertained the idea of building the Nabucco West pipeline, which would link up with natural gas-producing countries around the Caspian Sea, and even Iran. However, this project has virtually been abandoned due to competing projects such as the Trans-Anatolian Natural Gas Pipeline (TANAP) and the Trans-Adriatic Pipeline (TAP), which would provide direct access to Azerbaijan's natural gas reserves via Georgia and Turkey and then Greece, Albania and Italy, while bypassing Russia. This complex landscape could be disrupted by other trends, such as the development of liquefied natural gas (lng)LNG is composed almost entirely of methane. Liquefying the gas reduces its initial volume by a factor of around 600..., which can be transported by ship from anywhere in the world, the expansion of shale gasShale gas is found in deeply buried clayey sedimentary rock that is both the source rock and the reservoir for the gas... in the U.S., and Russia's historical tendency to turn its attention away from Europe to focus on its largest Asian neighbor, China.

Was this infographic interesting?

36 3