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Food, Energy and Climate

Increasing agricultural production affects energy consumption and CO2 emissions. ©Thinkstock

The food challenge – to feed a population of 9-10 billion people in 2050 – has serious implications: how can global hunger and malnutrition be eliminated without causing a surge in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions? Solutions will need to be applied at every link in a long chain of operations, from land management, foodstuff production, processing and transportation to storage, packaging and distribution. All of these operations are energy-intensive but vary from country to country depending on their level of development and societal traditions.

La responsabilité de l'alimentation dans le réchauffement climatique

Just like housing and transportation, the food industry is an essential component of human society. As is the case with these two sectors, the food supply chain – which encompasses farming, ranching, fishing, processing, distribution and consumption – consumes energy and releases greenhouse gasGas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... emissions, thereby contributing to global warmingGlobal warming, also called planetary warming or climate change.... Inevitably making the situation even more difficult, the global population is projected to grow by two to three billion people by the year 2050.

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Une prise de conscience croissante pour une alimentation plus durable

Solutions are available for reducing the food system’s environmental and energy footprint, including more efficient agricultural and ranching methods, shorter – or at least better designed – food supply chains and efforts to fight against crop destruction and waste, so that food isn’t produced in vain. Across the globe, there is a growing awareness that something must change.

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Combien de gaz à effet de serre dans nos assiettes occidentales ?

Food is a universal social concern. In many poor countries, the primary aim is to satisfy the population’s basic needs. In the developed world, the focus is often on how to make healthier, lower calorie meals, in order to combat obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Measuring the greenhouse gasGas with physical properties that cause the Earth's atmosphere to warm up. There are a number of naturally occurring greenhouse gases... (GHG) emissions of a dinner plate may be more difficult than calculating the GHG content of other products, but it’s an important factor in the fight against global warmingGlobal warming, also called planetary warming or climate change....

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